Usability

Submitted by (@michaelgrimes)

Easy error reporting

When a user encounters an error page they should be able to click a link that automatically sends the necessary information to the webmaster. They should not have to read a page of instructions on where to find the information and expect them to put it all into an email.

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6 votes
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Design

Submitted by (@andrewbeeken)

Keep it cheap!

Don't spend £2.8mil on your website - use third party applications and services where possible (Google etc) to add value to your site without the need for scoping new features into your already bloated CMS.

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5 votes
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Design

Submitted by (@andrewbeeken)

Don't break the user experience

There is nothing worse than being pushed to a service that's not technically part of the website and being met with an alien gui. If you're bringing another, developed service in (for example, The Meeting Factory on Lincoln's site - http://tmf.lincoln.gov.uk), skin it up to look like the rest of your site.

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5 votes
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Interactivity

Submitted by (@ben.plouviez)

Meaningful consultations

Encourage interactive interesting discussions about particular elements of a proposal - say, a new Local Plan - rather than shoving a large indigestible document out there and allowing the usual suspects to fire back a single (usually predictable) "response".

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5 votes
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Usability

Submitted by (@michele)

A user centred design approach

Although the user has been championed elsehwere, I think taking a holistic, iterative user centred approach is key to making a good website (as per the ISO standard 13407). This includes: 1. Defining the audiences and context of use. 2. Researching/defining user needs (using analytics, customer feedback, interviews, surveys, user testing on current site). 3. Designing the user experience based on user needs. 4. ...more »

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5 votes
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